Refuge and Refuse: Migrant Knowledge and Environmental Education in Germany

Joela Jacobs observes that “Migrant knowledge figures as a category of absence” in Europe. In Germany, one core issue is knowledge about recycling requirements and expectations. Efforts to teach it “betray an unreflective understanding of cultural identity”: knowing how to separate one’s trash serves as a marker of who belongs. (1,450 words)

Migrant Knowledge Notes 4

Upcoming Event: "Migrant Knowledge, Early Modern and Beyond: An Event at the Crossroads," University of Cambridge, September 15–17, 2019.

Call for Papers: "Environments of Exile: Refugees, Nature, and Representations: Biennial Conference of the North American Society for Exile Studies," September 18–20, 2020. Proposal deadline: September 30, 2019.

Exhibition: "The Warmth of Other Suns: Stories of Global Displacement,", The Phillips Collection, Washington, DC, June 22 – September 22, 2019.

Recent Events: Almost all of the conference reports in the Spring 2019 issue of the Bulletin of the German Historical Institute (Washington, DC) relate to migration and knowledge.

Article: Sören Urbansky, "A Chinese Plague: Sinophobic Discourses in Vladivostok, San Francisco, and Singapore" in the same issue is not about migrant knowledge per se, but it has implications for past knowledge about three Chinese diasporic communities on the Pacific Rim.

Article: Uwe Lübken, "Histories of the Unprecedented: Climate Change, Environmental Transformations, and Displacement in the United States" by Uwe Lübken, Open Library of Humanities 5, no. 1, January 29, 2019, <http: //doi.org/10.16995/olh.347>.

Reference: Version 2.0 of Barbara Lüthi, "Migration and History," Docupedia-Zeitgeschichte July 6, 2018, includes a section on knowledge.

Migration, Creativity, and the Construction of Knowledge

Benjamin Hein reflects on the nature of knowledge and knowledge formation in connection with a German migrant to North America in the mid-nineteenth century. What did it mean that this man, Christian Bönsel, could brag that he had been able to "learn and see how it goes in the world"? (1,455 words)

Migrant Knowledge Notes 3

Call: Migration and Racism in the United States and Germany in the Twentieth Century

  • Workshop, April 23–24, 2020, German Historical Institute Washington (GHI), Washington, DC
  • CFP Deadline: June 15, 2019

Program: In Global Transit: Forced Migration of Jews and other Refugees (1940s–1960s)

  • May 20–22, 2019, Pacific Regional Office of GHI Washington and the MAGNES Collection of Jewish Art and Life, both at the University of California, Berkeley

Crowdsourced Project: German Heritage in Letters

  • Digital project to find and share historic German-American correspondence
  • Managed by GHI Washington

Following the Archives: Migrating Documents and their Changing Meanings

Nick Underwood reflects on how files he had expected to find in Paris for his study of Franco-Yiddishness during the interwar period had, in fact, migrated elsewhere. He uses his surprise to discuss the part played by rescued or stolen documents in "the migratory history of knowledge and knowledge-making." (2,015 words)

Migrant Knowledge Notes 2

Call for Summer School Applications: Challenging the Sites of Knowledge: Medial and Pluri-Medial Configurations and Transformations

  • September 3–7, 2019, Graduate School of the Humanities, Universität Bern
  • Deadline: April 30, 2019

Grant in Aid Awards for Immigration History Research Center Archives (IHRCA) at the University of Minnesota

  • Deadline: June 1, 2019

Call for Papers: Extraction, Expropriation, Erasure? Knowledge Production in International Relations. Millenium: Journal of International Studies

  • October 19–20, 2019, London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE)
  • Deadline: June 30, 2019